Sequicentennial Farms

Sesquicentennial Farms of Goulbourn Township

Farming was a well established activity in the former Goulbourn Township. A Centennial project initiated in 1967 by the Junior Farmers’ Association  of Ontario (JFAO) identified farms meeting the criteria of being owned for 100 consecutive years by direct descendants of the same family and that a family member was still living on the farm, and it that was still in active operation.

As we celebrate Canada’s sesquicentennial, and in association with JFAO we have identified four families that have been farming the same land in Goulbourn Township for over 150 years. This is a noteworthy showing of dedication to their homesteads. In appreciation of the accomplishment by the Anderson, Dawson, Hobbs and Kenny families, the Goulbourn Township Historical Society celebrate this achievement.

A reception will be held on Saturday, November 25th from 11:00am to 1:00pm in the Grace Thompson meeting room at the Ottawa Public Library – Stittsville Branch, where in association with the Junior Farmers of Ontario, GTHS will be presenting the Canada 150 signs to the families.Come out and celebrate and thank our local farmers and their families for the phenomenal work they do and especially for the length of time they have been doing it. Hope to see you all there!

Nicholas Sparks

Nicholas Sparks

with Brian Hull

Speculated Portrait of Nicholas Sparks of Bytown

Nicholas Sparks (?) – photo courtesy of Brian Hull / Sparks family historian

Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 1:30pm at the Ottawa Public Library – Stittsville Branch, 1637 Stittsville Main Street Ottawa, ON, K2S Canada (map)

Come and be entertained by Brian Hull our guest speaker as he regales us with stories about his great-great-great-grandfather Nicholas Sparks. Sparks was born in 1794 and arrive in Wrightville (Hull-Gatineau) 201 years ago from Wexford, Ireland. He began working for Philemon Wright at £50 per year. He very quickly became a property owner and landlord in Bytown and owned most of the lands in the present day commercial core of Ottawa. He died here in 1862 and was buried in St. James Anglican Church Cemetery, Hull.

The presentation, parking and refreshments are all free. Remember, “tell a neighbour, bring a friend”.
See you there.

Road to Richmond

The Road to Richmond – October 21, 2017 – with Larry Cotton.

Richmond Road was built in 1818 to connect the military settlement at Richmond with Richmond Landing just below the Chaudière Falls on the Ottawa River in Bytown. The British Government had offered land in the Richmond area to British veterans of the War of 1812. Richmond Road was originally a corduroy road. Today, what is left of the road is paved. It is one of the oldest roads in Ottawa.

Corduroy Road – 1832 by Henry Byam Martin NAC115040

Looking forward to the 200th anniversary of Richmond in 2018, author Larry Cotton, will speak about “The Road to Richmond”. Larry is the author of 6 books including the well known, “Whiskey and Wickedness”. Larry’s books are all historical in nature as he has a passion for history.

This month’s event is held at the Richmond Legion <click here for map> starting at 1:30 pm. The presentation, parking and refreshments are all free. Remember, “tell a neighbour, bring a friend”.

See you there!

What Went Down in Struggle Town?

What Went Down in Struggle Town? 

Tracey Donaldson, Acting Manager and Acting Education Officer Sarah Holla from the Goulbourn Museum present What Went Down in Struggle Town? This presentation will examine the settlement, historic figures, and structures, which have defined the narrative of Stanley’s Corners.

Settlement of land in Upper Canada became a priority for the British Government following the conclusion of the War of 1812. Discharged soldiers who accepted land grants were the first to settle in Goulbourn with their presence creating a line of defense for Upper Canada against the Americans.

Wallins Atlas 1863

Belden’s Atlas 1879

At the intersection of 9th line and Regional Road 5 (Flewellyn and Huntley Roads) a small community known as Rathwells Corners grew as a busy stopping point between Richmond  and the Upper Ottawa Valley. By the 1850’s John Rathwell an early school teacher taught at a school located just west at Black’s Sideroad. Also his wife kept a stopping place or hotel at Rathwells Corners. By 1879 there was a store, St. Thomas Church, a saw mill, and a school. Later the community also supported a cheese factory, cement factory, post office and blacksmith shop. Eventually the Rathwell’s sold the Hotel to John Manchester and in turn to Jonathon Stanley. The small community then became known as Stanley Corners. It was nicknamed “Struggle Town” by the early Irish settlers, the history of Stanley Corners is marked by success, prosperity and tragedy.

SS#10 Stanley Corners 1926 – From Farms and Families

Were the settlers justified in nicknaming the community Struggle Town?

This presentation at the Goulbourn Museum, Saturday May 13 2017 starting at 1:30pm accompanies the Museum’s outdoor exhibition, which will formally launch during the summer event, Father’s Day Flashback: Ireland’s Own in June 2017.  As usual, attendance, parking and refreshments are free.  And remember, “tell a neighbour, bring a friend.

DNA for Geneology

Link

DNA for Genealogy with Jason Porteous
– note change of event

Genealogy – Undiscovered Family Facts – Marilyn Cottrell

Stittsville Legion
Saturday, April 8, 2017, 1:30pm

Jason is unable  to attend this meeting, but Historical Society and Program Committee member and great researcher, Marilyn Cottrell, has volunteered to step in. This promises to be a useful presentation for those interested in undiscovered family facts or who have reached brick-walls in their research.

What is a genealogical DNA test?

Join us for our April public programme as Jason Porteous, covers an overview of genetic genealogy testing, as well as discussing some of the actual sites and tools that can be used to do research into one match results. He will be focusing on the use of autosomal DNA.  A genealogical DNA test looks at a person’s genome at specific locations for the purposes of determining ethnicity and genealogical relationships. Results give information about ethnic groups the tested person may be descended from and about other individuals that they may be related to. Jason recently assisted a man whose mother has an unknown father. From her test results her son was able to zero in on a very likely individual who should be her dad, a good example of how DNA can work in genealogy.

Jason is a project administrator for the Porteous Surname Project (which is hosted on the Family Tree DNA site). He has been working on his own Family Tree for over 30 years and became interested in using DNA as a research tool when he got involved in the National Geographic Genographic project. This promises to be a useful presentation for those interested in undiscovered family facts or who have reached brick-walls in their research.

The presentation at the Stittsville Legion – starts at 1:30PM and as usual, admission is open to all, parking and refreshments are free.

Caretaker of Dreams

History of Goulbourn – Caretaker of Dreams
– event now completed

Audience enjoying the screening of “Caretaker of Dreams” – photo Robert Halberstadt

This event was very well attended, including several participants from the original live presentation in 2000. The movie-theatre-like presentation, including bags of popcorn added to the atmosphere.Thanks for all who attended.

You’re in for a treat as we digitally reprise the Millennium Pageant “Caretaker of Dreams” on Saturday March 25th, 2017 at the Richmond Legion. The Play was written by Barbara Bottriell, directed by Shelagh Mills and produced by the Goulbourn Millennium Project Committee.

Goulbourn’s 2000 Millennium Pageant

This is the story of Goulbourn Township from the early Richmond settlement in 1818 to the youths’ vision of the future beyond 2000. It was conceived not as a history lesson, but as recognition of the achievements of the township pioneers. The play was initially planned as a millennial project, but also became a record of our history as the Province on Ontario decreed that Goulbourn Township would disappear with the expanded border of the City of Ottawa in 2000.

The Goulbourn Township Historical Society was sponsor of the project and the play was produced by the Goulbourn Millennium Project Committee chaired by Jean Shaw.

This was a great community event including over 100 Township actors, musicians and dancers supported by dance director Christine Delorme-Lamarche, Sets by Ron Martin, Lighting by Paul Gardner, musical director Barbara Bottriell, Costumes by Lynn Griffiths and Production co-ordination by Hilary Dick.

The pageant was held November 22-25 2000 in the then new Theatre of the Performing Arts at Sacred Heart Catholic High School in Stittsville. Videographer Sandy Durocher recorded this spectacular event. It is this recording transformed into a digital format by Russell Mason, that we will be showing at the Richmond Legion as our March 25th 2017 community event. Show time is 1:30pm. The Legion is located at   6430 Ottawa St, Richmond, ON. Come along, and bring a friend to relive our heritage. Refreshments will also be available.